Panoramic Photos

updated March 31, 2011

I enjoy making interesting photos.   I recently discovered some free software called AutoStitch which is a product of the AI Lab at the University of British Columbia.   This software will stitch together a group of photographs into a larger image.   It is so easy to use.   Just take a group of photos of a subject, drop them into a folder on your computer and point the software at these photos.   The photos do not have to be in any particular sequence.   The software figures it out and stitches them together quickly.   I have more information about making the Battle Oaks photo.






A panorama of our backyard taken on May 3, 2008.   This was taken before the patch of elbow bush just behind
our house was removed, and before our new deck was added.
a 2,560 x 847 version (649 kb) of this image







The Battle Oaks located at 24th Street and Inner Campus Drive on the campus of The University of Texas.
It is believed that the three oldest of these oaks antedate the Civil War.   In 1923 these oaks were
under threat of being cut down to make space for the new Biology building.   Dr. William James Battle,
professor of the classics, saved the trees.   Legend has it that Dr. Battle sat under the trees with
a shotgun and defied the administration's axe.   The Biology building was built elsewhere, the trees
were saved and named after Dr. Battle.  
This picture was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 53 images.   The original photos consists of
five rows of ten to twelve overlapping photos.   I have more information about making the Battle Oaks photo.
a 1280 x 573 version (254 kb) of this image







Saturday, January 27 was a foggy morning at our house.   This is a 180 degree panaorama of our backyard.
I was standing just behind our house.   To the left you can see my neighbor's driveway.   To the right
you can see my other neighbor's fence.   The larger trees are called Cedar Elms.   The smaller "trees" are
actually large native persimmon bushes.   Some of these are 15 feet tall and may be 20 years old.
This picture was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 43 images.
a 1571 x 736 version (247 kb) of this image







The City of Austin and Lady Bird Lake (formerly known as Town Lake).   This is a view looking toward
the Congress Avenue Bridge (known for its bats) from the south end of the South First Street Bridge.
This picture was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 14 images.
a 1600 x 725 version (142 kb) of this image







Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium - home of the Texas Longhorns in Austin, Texas.   This photo was
taken on Saturday, October 27, 2007 just before the Texas-Nebraska football game.   The Longhorn band
is playing "The Eyes of Texas".   The Texas Longhorn team held on for a 28 - 25 victory.
This picture was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 20 images.
a 1600 x 516 version (187 kb) of this image







The Cotton Bowl in Dallas, TX on Saturday, October 6, 2007.   The annual Red River Rivalry between
Texas and Oklahoma.   The stadium is split 50-50 at the 50 yard line with the OU fans in red in the
south end of the stadium (left) and the Texas fans in orange in the north end of the stadium (right).
This pre-game photo was taken while the Texas Longhorn Band was playing the "Eyes of Texas".
This picture was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 6 images.
a 1600 x 404 version (244 kb) of this image







Photo taken on Saturday, August 18, 2007   This is a 180 degree view of the Guadalupe River at River Lodging B&B,
about half way between Ingram and Hunt, Texas or about 75 miles NW of San Antonio.
This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 11 images.   The original photos consists of one row of eleven overlapping photos.
a 1200 x 237 version (61 kb) of this image







Another photo of the Guadalupe River taken on August 18, 2007.
This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 16 images.   The original photos consists
of two rows of overlapping photos, 8 of the top, and 8 of the bottom.
a 1200 x 413 version (109 kb) of this image







This is a 360 degree view of our Great Room (family, kitchen, breakfast) taken from the end of the kitchen counter.
This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 40 images in about 10 minutes.   The original photos consists
of three rows of overlapping photos, 13 of the top, 14 in the middle, and 13 of the bottom.
a 1600 x 403 version (98 kb) of this image







The Pennybacker Bridge is a landmark in Austin.   This bridge is where Loop 360 crosses the Colorado River.
This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 6 overlapping images in less than 5 minutes.
a 1200 x 294 version (57 kb) of this image







This is a 180+ degree view of our front yard and house.   Our street can be seen on each side as the photo wraps around.
This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 34 images in about 10 minutes.   The original photos consists of three
rows of overlapping photos, 11 photos of the top, 12 photos in the 2nd row, and 11 photos in the bottom.
a 1200 x 389 version (112 kb) of this image







This is a 180 degree view of our front yard taken from just in front of the house.   The sides of the image
show the corners of the house.   This was "stitched" together by AutoStitch from 14 images in less than 10 minutes.
The original photos consists of two rows of overlapping photos, 7 photos in each row.
a 1200 x 326 version (99 kb) of this image







This is a simple panoramic photo that I stitched together from three photos taken in July 2004.
a 1351 x 416 version (116 kb) of this image



This is a update of that same photo taken on August 12, 2007.
a 1351 x 416 version (112 kb) of this image





Things that can go wrong

Sometimes things can go wrong and produce interesting results.


This was an attempt at stitching together the Great Room view (above).   I believe this had two setup mistakes.
(1) I accidentally included photos of a totally different subject.   (2) I did a complete 360 degrees - it could not find the edge.
The software appears obsessed with the wall clock, sort of a Salvador Dali type thing.
a 1200 x 531 version (82 kb) of this image

I have learned a few things:

1)Take photos with plenty of overlap.   I do 50% overlap from one photo to the next.   This appears to greatly help the software match up the photos.

2) The software will use a lot of computer memory based upon the number and size of photos.   I have a PC with 4 GB of memory and a 3.2 GHz dual-core Intel processor.   When I gave it 40 photos at high resolution (4000x3000), it ran out of memory until I reduced the output to 35%.   The software still produced a large image - the Great Room panoramic above at 10,357 x 2,606.   This has enough detail to easily read the titles of the cookbooks on the shelves under the kitchen island.

3) Only include the photos that are part of the picture. ;-)







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updated March 31, 2011